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Opinion: What the ruling means for Dwyer and other cases

Prof. Shane Kilcommins (School of Law) wrote an opinion piece for the Irish Examiner on the law relating to the Data Retention Act 2011, the findings in the High Court case last week, and the possible consequences for the Dwyer case and other investigations. Read in full: http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/views/analysis/what-the-ruling-means-for-dwyer-and-other-cases-890696.html

All posts, Articles, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Research

ANALYSIS: Why do so many capitals of culture run into problems?

Analysis: as Galway is currently finding out, the experience of being the designated Capital of Culture does not always run smoothly. By Dr Niamh NicGhabhann, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, for RTÉ Brainstorm. In 2013, the streets of the city of Marseille were filled with sheep, horses and cattle. The animals filled the… Continue reading ANALYSIS: Why do so many capitals of culture run into problems?

All posts, Articles, Modern Languages & Applied Linguistics, Research

Opinion: Is it time for some Digital Wisdom about Digital Natives?

By Dr Silvia Benini, School of Modern Languages and Applied Linguistics at the University of Limerick. Analysis: a new study looks at what Irish students really think about the technology they use in secondary schools. Student attitudes and usage seem to be more cautious when it comes to the role of technology in the educational sphere.… Continue reading Opinion: Is it time for some Digital Wisdom about Digital Natives?

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Opinion: Boris Johnson and the reality of anti-Muslim racism

James Carr (Department of Sociology, University of Limerick) writes for RTÉ's Brainstorm that if we're going to challenge Islamophobia and controversial comments like those of Boris Johnson, we need to start recognising it as anti-Muslim racism. "Islamophobia, or anti-Muslim racism, is no stranger to Ireland. For the past decade, I have been researching with Muslim… Continue reading Opinion: Boris Johnson and the reality of anti-Muslim racism

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OPINION: A question of consent

Dr Susan Leahy (School of Law)  has contributed an article to RTE Brainstorm which discusses her research on sexual offences. She discusses the challenges of proving an absence of consent in rape trials and suggests the introduction of judicial directions to guide jurors in interpreting the new statutory definition of consent which was included in… Continue reading OPINION: A question of consent

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Opinion: Is Zimbabwe about to have an electoral earthquake?

Analysis: next week's election will see if Zimbabwe's voters are ready for change after decades of treachery, suspicion and fear under Robert Mugabe. Written by John Hogan, Department of Politics and Public Administration, University of Limerick for RTÉ Brainstorm. "Fears of rigging and repression remain, as 45 percent of voters think it likely that incorrect results will be… Continue reading Opinion: Is Zimbabwe about to have an electoral earthquake?

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Defining Consent in Irish Sexual Offences Law: Unfinished Business

Criminal Justice in Ireland

Dr Susan Leahy

The introduction of a statutory definition of consent in the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2017 represented a significant development of Irish sexual offences law, bringing it into conformity with that of other common law jurisdictions such as England and Wales and Canada. Section 48 of the 2017 Act amends the Criminal Law (Rape) (Amendment) Act 1990 to provide a two-tier definition of consent, beginning with a clear, positive statement of what constitutes a legally valid consent to sexual activity: ‘A person consents to a sexual act if he or she freely and voluntarily agrees to engage in that act’. The second tier then gives further guidance on consent, providing a list of eight situations where consent will be deemed to be absent (e.g. where an individual submits as a result of the use or threat of force; where an individual is asleep or unconscious, or; where…

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All posts, Articles, Modern Languages & Applied Linguistics, Research

OPINION: Just how much of social media is enough?

By Silvia Benini, Marta Giralt and Liam Murray, School of Modern Languages and Applied Linguistics, University of Limerick, for RTÉ Brainstorm. Social media use and abuse is a widely acknowledged international phenomenon. We appear to be eating, living and sleeping social media, whilse ignoring the potential risk to millions in human development caused by our… Continue reading OPINION: Just how much of social media is enough?

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OPINION: Mediation process still has a long way to go

Dr Mary Tumelty (School of Law, UL) has an opinion piece in today’s Irish Examiner on mediation in medical negligence cases. CervicalCheck cases highlight fundamental problems with the adversarial approach taken in medical negligence litigation. The cases taken by a number of women affected by the scandal including Vicky Phelan and Emma Ni Mhathúna have… Continue reading OPINION: Mediation process still has a long way to go

All posts, Articles, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Research

OPINION: Summer festivals: a queue for a portaloo or a play at revolution?

In her opinion piece on RTÉ's Brainstorm, Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance) argues that attending a festival in itself is something of a transgressive act. Festivals and festive events can act in many ways. They can provide an important point of continuity for communities, communal rituals that allow them to… Continue reading OPINION: Summer festivals: a queue for a portaloo or a play at revolution?

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OPINION: The kids are not alright: why some children are in a legal bind

An opinion piece written by Dr Lydia Bracken, School of Law, published on RTÉ Brainstorm, examines the legal implications of the delay in the commencing the provisions of the Children and Family Relationships Act 2015 that relate to donor-assisted human reproduction (DAHR). But celebrating three years of marriage equality is tempered by the fact that… Continue reading OPINION: The kids are not alright: why some children are in a legal bind

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OPINION: Why reform of Seanad Éireann should start with the electorate

Dr Laura Cahillane (School Of Law) writes for RTÉ'S Brainstorm that the 7th amendment of the Constitution allows all graduates in Ireland to vote in Seanad elections, but the enabling legislation has never been enacted. It is clear that reform of the Seanad, if it is to happen, will be a complicated process and it is… Continue reading OPINION: Why reform of Seanad Éireann should start with the electorate